Undergraduates moved from residential to purpose built student accommodation

Undergraduates moved from residential to purpose built student accommodation

It’s common practice for students to live in designated accommodation in their first year of study. Frequently called ‘halls’, developments with indiv

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It’s common practice for students to live in designated accommodation in their first year of study. Frequently called ‘halls’, developments with individual bedrooms and communal living areas locate together to create a kind of student village on or near to university campuses. In years 2 and 3 however, undergraduates crave a little more independence and get a taste for their impending adult lives by moving into shared houses.

A select few streets within every university city is lined with high floor terraced houses that squeeze in up to 6 or 7 students at one time. The nature of terraced streets means that they tend to be situated a little further away from uni and closer to non-student residents living in the same, or nearby roads.

When these two communities collide, a number of problems surface. Councils are being inundated with complaints reporting antisocial behaviour, noise, litter and even rats. Some areas are described as becoming a student campus of their own, with many couples young and old, plus families being forced to pack up and move away from the commotion.

Nevertheless, times are changing. Under new order, landlords must now ask Parliament for permission to let out houses to students. This combined with a push for more purpose-built student accommodation in popular university towns is urging a positive movement to unfold.

The city of Liverpool is just one example of where this sort of struggle has emerged. Its residents in Wavertree are at war with rowdy students who don’t take responsibility for their surrounding environment, and they are happy to hear that the council pledges more purpose-built student developments in the area.

New student projects are being designed and constructed with university goers in mind and thus offer more favourable living spaces than that available in dated and grimy dwellings. Rooms are fitted out with the latest furnishings tailored to the work and play balance adopted by so many British students.

In some cases, kitchens and en suite bathrooms are integrated into studio and 1-bedroom apartments to create an all-in-one space for tenants. Additionally, communal zones are embellished with wide-screen TVS, games rooms, cinemas, cafés, rooftops and gardens which are miles apart from the cramped and dark living rooms of student digs.

The best thing about these developments is that they do not encroach on other tenants. There are no disturbed neighbours or filthy streets when students unite in specialist buildings away from houses and residential flats. A focus on driving them away from residentially popular areas means that these urban zones can make way for more young professionals, couples and families who prefer the quiet life.

With purpose-built student accommodation proving to be the fastest growing property sector in the UK, and with some of the highest yields, there’s no better time than now to invest. Demand for better university living has been rising over time, but now, with more students applying for higher education and more opting for residence in student-only developments, demand is higher than ever.

For information on property investment opportunities contact RWinvest on +44 (0)151 808 1250 Email: info@rw-invest.com or visit our website.